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How Long Does a Double Process Color Last?

How Long Does a Double Process Color Last?

Double process color is a two-step hair coloring technique that combines light and dark colors to create a more natural, dimensional look. It’s a great option for those who want to add some depth and dimension to their hair, but it’s important to know that it won’t last forever. Most double-process colors will start to fade after about eight weeks, so it’s important to touch up your color every few weeks to keep it looking its best.

In this article, we’ll take a closer look at the double process color and how long it’s likely to last. We’ll also provide some tips on how to extend the life of your color and keep it looking its best.

So, How Long Does a Double Process Color Last?

Generally speaking, most double-process colors will start to fade after about eight weeks. However, there are a few things you can do to extend the life of your color and keep it looking its best for longer.

How to Know When It’s Time to Touch Up Your Color?

There are a few telltale signs that it’s time to touch up your color. If you notice that your hair is looking dull or flat, or if you see any new grays sprouting up, it’s probably time for a color refresh.

You might also notice that your color doesn’t seem to be taking as well as it used to, or that it’s not as vibrant as it once was. If you find yourself having to use more and more products to get the same results, it’s probably time for a touch-up.

How Much Should You Touch Up Your Color?

When it comes to touching up your color, less is more. You don’t want to overdo it, as this can lead to an unnatural-looking result. A good rule of thumb is to only touch up the roots, and avoid coloring the rest of your hair. This will help to keep your color looking natural and prevent any unwanted bleaching.

How Much Does It Cost to Touch Up Your Color?

The cost of touching up your color will vary depending on the salon you go to and the products they use. Generally speaking, you can expect to pay anywhere from $50 to $100 for a root touch-up.

Factors That Can Cause Your Color to Fade

There are a few factors that can cause your color to fade prematurely. If you wash your hair too often or use harsh shampoos and conditioners, this can strip away the color and cause it to fade.

Exposure to sunlight can also cause your color to fade, so it’s important to use a heat protectant spray when you’re outdoors. Swimming in chlorinated water can also cause your color to fade, so it’s best to avoid swimming pools if possible.

In addition, using hot tools too often can cause your color to fade. If you must use hot tools, be sure to use a heat protectant spray beforehand.

What Are Some Tips for Extending the Life of Your Color?

There are a few things you can do to extend the life of your color and keep it looking its best for longer.

Here are a few tips:

  • Use a color-protecting shampoo and conditioner: Look for products that are designed to prolong color-treated hair. These products can help to seal in your color and prevent it from fading too quickly.
  • Limit your time in the sun: UV rays can cause hair color to fade, so it’s important to limit your time in the sun if you want your color to last.
  • Avoid hot water: Hot water can strip color from hair, so it’s best to avoid it if you can. When you do need to use hot water, try to rinse your hair with cool water afterward to help seal in your color.
  • Touch up your roots regularly: One of the best ways to prolong color is to touch up your roots on a regular basis. This will help to keep your color looking fresh and prevent it from fading too quickly.

The Bottom Line

In conclusion, double process color generally lasts for about eight weeks. However, a few habits can help extend the life of your hair color and maintain its vibrancy. If you notice your color starting to fade, touch up your roots regularly and use a shampoo and conditioner that barrier against fading. By following the tips above, you can keep your color looking fresh and vibrant for weeks to come.

Related: How Long Does a Single Process Color Last?